Ferris Goodridge Post 330

    Post History

                                                                                            

                                                               Edwin Ferris                                                                                              Leo Goodridge

 

Ferris Goodridge Post 330 was named in honor of Edward Ferris of the 27th Army Division and Leo Goodridge of the 78th Army Division. Both men were natives of the Town of Ogden , and both were killed in action in World War I.  Pvt. Edward L. Ferris entered the service on May 21, 1917. He was assigned to the 108th Regiment, Infantry Machine Gun Company. He was killed in action near St. Souplet, France on October 17, 1918. He is buried in St. John's Cemetery in Spencerport, NY.  Pvt. Leo Goodridge entered the service on September 7, 1917. He was assigned to Battery D, 309th Heavy Artillery, 78th Division as a cannoneer. He was seriously wounded by shrapnel on September 30, 1918 near Norray, France. He was moved to a French hospital where he died on October 19, 1918. He is buried in Creekside Cemetery in Churchville, NY.  Ironically, both men died within two days of each other.

      Ferris Goodridge was the first chartered American Legion Post outside the city of Rochester in 1919.  It didn’t get organized without its challenges.  At the time, any application for a charter had to be approved by a Senior Commander within the national organization.  At the time, William Donovan was designated as Commander of the Western District of New York.  Unfortunately, Colonel Donovan was still on active duty with the United States Army and sailed for Japan 3 days before our request for charter was received at his home.  This request was forwarded to Japan and followed him to though out his travels in Japan until it caught up to him 2 months later.  As luck would have it, once he signed it, his wife was returning state side so she brought it with her when she returned.  As far as we know, we are the only American Legion Post in the United States that was approved outside the continental United States.  The charter was signed on August 27, 1919.  Of the original 41 posts that were charted in 1919, Ferris Goodridge is one of only 11 posts to remain active for the continuous 100 years. Post 330 began with twenty members with Ray Austin becoming Ferris Goodridge's first commander.  The Monroe County American Legion history reflects there were 109 American Legion Posts chartered within the county. 

Affiliated Organizations

Auxiliary

    It organization was as a result of Congressional Authority in 1920 to  help support the veterans returning from WWI. Auxiliary Unit 330 of Ferris Goodridge Post 330 was formed on 1925 with 25 female relatives of war era veterans. It has since gone through many transformations and unfortunately many more conflicts in which our veterans fought.  It latest transformation that occurred jusr this year, allows the spouses of all eligible veterans to join.  It was previously limited to female relatives, but with the increasing number of female veterans, many spouses (both male & female) were not eligible to join the Legion Family ranks.  The Legion has every reason to be proud of it's Auxiliary as they are always ready, willing and capable to carry the torch for our veterans in all of their activities.

Sons of the American Legion

A Sons of the American Legion (SAL) supporting Ferris Goodridge was formed on 1935. The Legion has every reason to be proud of it's Sons of Legion Squadron, which gained statewide recognition because of it's programs of service.

 

Patriotic Days

MEMORIAL DAY has always been an outstanding occasion in this community. In addition to memorial events throughout the Spencerport/Ogden community, the  goal of every Veteran to it's last man is to keep MEMORIAL DAY sacred to the memory of our war dead of all of the wars of the country; and all graves are decorated on this National Holiday.

ARMISTICE DAY, now called VETERANS' DAY, originally marked the end of fighting in World War I. It is an important holiday on the calendar of Legionnaires everywhere and in the hearts of all Veterans.  An important tradition was established when the Post led in the memorial exercises at 11 o'clock on the morning of November 11, marking the exact hour of the cessation of hostility on the war fronts.

Location Of Graves of Our Fallen Comrades

Since it's inception American Legion Post 330 has been a leader in this community in the area of locating veteran graves.  Grave location enables all interested parties to locate the site of their loved one. Each year, active members & volunteers of the Ferrid Goodridge Family place a flag on each of our over 1,500 Veteran graves at our 9 local cemeterys.  

Scholarships and Community Projects

American LegionPost 330 sponsors various scholarships for the further education of our children. We also sponsor and financially assist many worthy community projects and programs initiated by the National American Legion.

Join Us and Keep this History Alive